Opinion: What 6th District race means for Georgia Republicans

Attorney General Chris Carr speaks during a GOTV rally at the Cobb County GOP headquarters ahead of the 6th District special election. Georgia Republicans will have to keep up the intensity to hold onto a seat they might’ve once taken for granted. (Branden Camp / Special)

Tuesday night was a good, but not quite great, night for Jon Ossoff. It will have been a good, and not mediocre, night for Georgia Republicans if it leaves them with the feeling they may need to maintain to win in this new political environment: a little bit scared.

Not scared as in lacking the courage of their convictions, but in the sense they can’t take their dominance of Georgia politics for granted any longer.

They didn’t take the special election in 6th Congressional District for granted, which is why we aren’t referring to Ossoff today as a congressman-elect. National Democrats’ latest heartthrob, to whom they sent millions of dollars, did his part to drive enthusiastic liberals to the polls. His campaign affirmed the surprising 46.8 percent support Hillary Clinton got in the 6th vs. Donald Trump last November, which until Tuesday was logically seen by many of us as a single data point set against years of contrary experience.

Despite those millions from blue states, however, Ossoff barely built upon Clinton’s progress. That’s due in large part to the seriousness with which Republicans treated the race. With their share of the electorate splintered among a half-dozen legitimate candidates, it was conceivable Ossoff could sneak his way to an outright win in the first round of balloting. The GOP prodded its voters to the polls and needed every bit of the 43 percent turnout — huge for a special election — to ensure a runoff.

That they did so without the glee and unity of purpose Democrats marshalled behind Ossoff may be instructive about how they must win in Georgia going forward.

Republicans’ internal disagreements about Trump aren’t going away. And some of the elements of Trumpism that won over blue-collar workers in states like Michigan don’t go over as well with the more affluent suburbanites north of Atlanta who for years have reliably voted Republicans. But what the 6th shows — so far — is this trade-off need not be fatal to Republicans’ chances in such a district. They just have to work at it a bit differently.

That may mean the Republican fad of large, fractious candidate fields will continue, though one wonders if Georgia Democrats, more apt to coalesce quickly behind their choice, will make them pay for it sometime soon. (How the state party might bring some internal discipline to this process ought to be asked of those vying to be the next Georgia GOP chairman.)

One way to avoid that is with a quick mending of fences between the surviving Republican and the vanquished. That too got under way before the vote-counting was even finished, as most of the top GOP candidates lined up behind Karen Handel.

Let me say here that Handel deserves this, and more. It was significant to see fast pledges of support for her from House Speaker David Ralston and Chris Riley, chief of staff to Gov. Nathan Deal. Handel ran for governor in 2010 as an anti-establishment candidate, and hard feelings toward her lingered among elected Republicans for a while — even as she dutifully rallied her supporters behind GOP nominees. To see that wound stitched up now is more than surely gratifying to her. It’s absolutely necessary if she’s to beat Ossoff.

Now she’ll have to pioneer a path other Republicans, in Georgia and beyond, may find useful: how to embrace Trump just enough to please his fervent supporters, while maintaining just enough distance that she doesn’t needlessly whip up his detractors.

Compared to that, the rest of this should be a breeze.

Reader Comments 0

240 comments
AndyManUSA#45
AndyManUSA#45

 The reason we are so happy is that the big picture is astoundingly positive.  Perhaps this is why the Democrats have to scream so very loudly and continuously, in their effort to drown it out.  There are so many things to celebrate, in a few short months, it is hard to remember them all.  Jobless claims are at a seventeen-year low.  Illegal border crossings are at a 20-year low.  The stock market had the longest winning streak since 1987.  Our trade deficit is down and exports are up.  Companies are hiring.  We are beginning a sane energy policy.  Job-crushing government regulations and  waste are being rolled back.  Four thousand illegal Somalis have been deported, and embassies told to slow down and do their job in vetting.  The speed of change to rational, pro-America policies is dazzling.


Fact


http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/04/why_trump_supporters_are_still_solid_.html


SGTGrit
SGTGrit

"Science will tell you where the earth came from, and people too."

Science isn't consistent it changes. People were once told that earth was flat, Isaiah described its shape in the Old Testament. Nothing against science but it changes the science book you had in elementary school is now obsolete. The Bible has remained consistent.

breckenridge
breckenridge

re: inerrancy


If you believe the New Testament is word-for-word true, then you are a complete idiot and a stupid loser.


Amen.

SGTGrit
SGTGrit

@breckenridge  Says the blogs complete idiot and a stupid loser. You don't have much cred there fool.

breckenridge
breckenridge

@Starik @SGTGrit @breckenridge 

Okay, let's take an example from the New Testament, the story about Jesus turning water and bread into a feast for the gathered crowd.

That story is allegorical. It's meant to show the Jesus was a special sort of person. It it NOT literal; a literal interpretation would come smack dab out of the book of of paganism.

breckenridge
breckenridge

This week the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear a Missouri case which involves using taxpayer funds to build a playground made of used tires at a religious school.  I'm not what religion the school is affiliated with - it could be Hindu, Christian, Jewish, Muslim or any of a number of other religions.

Regardless of what faith it is, the standard should be exactly the same.

breckenridge
breckenridge

April 23 - As Donald Trump approaches his 100th day in the White House, the Republican is suffering the lowest approval ratings of any President since 1945.

Compared with his Democrat and Republican predecessors since the Second World War, no President has dipped as low so early on in their first term as Mr Trump, who has an approval rating of 42 per cent.

When Barack Obama was approaching his first 100 days, he had 69 per cent approval, exactly the same as the average approval rating for past Presidents at this stage in their first term.

His hardcore supporters are still on board but that's about it.

bu22
bu22

@SGTGrit @breckenridge WaPo poll says 96% of Trump supporters would vote for him again.  85% of HRC supporters would do so.  You are just living in your liberal delusional bubble to think otherwise.  Probably should broaden your reading away from MSM.

SGTGrit
SGTGrit

Ask yourselves after all you see and learn that there was not a creator a supreme being that created and knit this fragile world together. Only a belief in a failed political ideology would prevent you from the truth. Sadly, there are those from extreme ignorance who deny that truth.

Starik
Starik

@SGTGrit Science will tell you where the earth came from, and people too.

AndyManUSA#45
AndyManUSA#45

 Trump’s supporters are unfazed that a new health-care law is not in place (yet), thrilled with the appointment of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, weary of the constant accusations of his ties to Russia, supportive of his strike against Syria for using chemical weapons against its people and dismayed that House Republicans and Democrats are unwilling to compromise. To them, the president remains disruptive, unconventional, defiant and willing to change his mind — appealing attributes to his supporters, but not so to the press.


And to the press, I say deal with it.


http://nypost.com/2017/04/22/how-trump-voters-feel-about-his-first-100-days/

Starik
Starik

@AndyManUSA#45 Hopefully, most Trump voters will eventually recognize that they have been had. Trump is not what they expected; he's unprepared, slow to learn, and has no principles except the accumulation of money for friends and family.

SGTGrit
SGTGrit

@Starik @AndyManUSA#45  Yet he goes on goes to accomplish more in less than 100 days into his presidency than Obama accomplished in his eight years. The left can't hold up Obama's accomplishments, they can only blame Trump, for for his failures. 

SGTGrit
SGTGrit

What a pathetic joke...Breckinridge submits as Biblical scholars. The Westar Institute founded by the late Robert Funk as a supposed academic think-tank that was actually formed to undermine Christianity. His work The Jesus Seminar" was authored for that purpose. The so called Biblical scholars were biased atheists. Of course as I noted these people never tried to deny that Jesus was a man who preached the word of God and that there was an Apostle Paul who wrote seven letters in the New Testament that all Biblical history Scholars don't deny although Paul did write most of the New Testament through his letters. Breckenridge hides from my earlier challenge to show how Darwin's Theory of evolution is now accepted science.

AndyManUSA#45
AndyManUSA#45

@SGTGrit brokenridge has partaken of the fruit the serpent was peddling and he is fully on board with it. Normally, I would pray for his soul but I'm afraid there is no hope for this one. 

FIGMO2
FIGMO2

@breckenridge 

I'm not a hard left liberal. In fact I'm not a liberal at all.  I'm a fiscal conservative that quit the GOP in disgust 19 years ago because the party was destroyed by the scum that is the religious right.

I've seen where you want your fiscal conservatism to lead, and I just can't go there, breckenridge.

Using government funds or the lack thereof to dictate whose babies should be born and whose shouldn't.

That's a slippery slope I won't step onto.

Whereas you see other people's children as a financial burden, I see them as a potential resource in more ways than one. 

FIGMO2
FIGMO2

@breckenridge @FIGMO2

That's not what I was talking about. In the past you've said that when women on welfare continue to have children, their benefits should be cut off unless they're willing to undergo sterilization.  

Eeeewwwwww

Resist Trump
Resist Trump

Yo, IReportYouWhine -- whatever brainwashing tool they used on you, it worked wonders.  

AndyManUSA#45
AndyManUSA#45

@Resist Trump Hear the Word of God, heathen -


Deuteronomy 30


11 Now what I am commanding you today is not too difficult for you or beyond your reach. 12 It is not up in heaven, so that you have to ask, “Who will ascend into heaven to get it and proclaim it to us so we may obey it?” 13 Nor is it beyond the sea, so that you have to ask, “Who will cross the sea to get it and proclaim it to us so we may obey it?” 14 No, the word is very near you; it is in your mouth and in your heart so you may obey it.


Resist evil, not Trump, stooge.


It's a lot easier. And more rewarding.

breckenridge
breckenridge

Those scholars also agree that was an Apostle Paul and they agree he did indeed write most of the new Testament

What? No.  The authors of the 4 gospels in the New Testament are unknown.  And the Gospel of John, which varies greatly from the other three, was written in the last decade of the 1st century AD.   

irishmafia1457
irishmafia1457

What it means is that conservatives need to get off their butts ...vote...work to see other conservatives get out and vote...demand that the early voters are actually registered to vote i.e. no more liberal dead voters !  and get their voices heard. Complacency will  bring disastrous results

SGTGrit
SGTGrit

Breckenridge says"If you consider the authors of the New Testament as historical scholars you truly are a fool." This gem proves beyond any reasonable doubt that this guy has the worst comprehension ability on these blogs or he's running away from an argument he can't win like a scalded dog. The educated scholars are those who examine Biblical history and draw their conclusions from evidence from that time. It should be clear to anyone who followed my post and the interchange that I wasn't referring to the Apostle Paul as one of the educated scholars of Biblical History, Paul was living that history. Geez, how pathetic.

breckenridge
breckenridge

@SGTGrit 

Oh you want modern day Biblical scholars? Here you go then........

 The Jesus Seminar was organized in 1985 to renew the quest of the historical Jesus and to report the results of its research to the general public, rather than just to a handful of gospel specialists. Initially, the goal of the Seminar was to review each of the sayings and deeds attributed to Jesus in the gospels and determine which of them could be considered authentic.

 https://www.westarinstitute.org/projects/the-jesus-seminar/

AndyManUSA#45
AndyManUSA#45

If a school district in Pennsylvania decides that it wants to instruct it's children on intelligent design and the majority of the parents agree, the school board agrees, the decision was arrived at in a democratic fashion, then who in the F is the federal government to say otherwise?


This is the Land of the Free, vladmir.

breckenridge
breckenridge

@AndyManUSA#45 

Intelligent Design is creationism repackaged.  It has no place in the science curriculum.

Nor was the Constitution designed to favor the opinion of the majority. The intent behind the Constitution was to protect the rights  of all Americans.  But that's not really relevant in the Dover PA case since it is a 1st Amendment issue.

Now, in general......when you consider a question, any question, regarding church and state ask yourself this: would I be okay with handing out payer dollars if this were a Muslim group? If the answer is no, then you've answered the question yourself.

SGTGrit
SGTGrit

@breckenridge @AndyManUSA#45  I'll present the challenge again, scalded dog, where and how has evolution graduated into settled science. If it has not it has no business being taught in our schools.

AndyManUSA#45
AndyManUSA#45

@breckenridge @AndyManUSA#45 We're not talking about some backwards, stone age civilization, vladmir. We are not in the business of accommodating the needs of savages from strange foreign lands. If you would like to practice islam, I can think of ten countries off the top of my head that you are more than welcome to move to, have fun with the whole sex change issue when you get there.


We are talking about the sovereign people of Pennsylvania, and what they decide and what they believe in, that is none of your business, vlady.


We don't need your "help."

breckenridge
breckenridge

@AndyManUSA#45 @breckenridge 

Throughout history any time church and state have become intertwined the rights of the people have been trampled and eventually chaos has reigned.


The brilliant James Madison, the author of the Bill Of Rights and primary intellect behind the US Constitution, was well aware of this:

"The purpose of separation of church and state is to keep forever from these shores the ceaseless strife that has soaked the soil of Europe with blood for centuries."  James Madison, 1821

SGTGrit
SGTGrit

Evolution is a theory unsupported by any evidence that's why it's called Darwins theory. All educated scholars regardless of political or religious persuasion agree that there was indeed a man named Jesus Christ who preached about God and who was executed by the Romans. Those scholars also agree that was an Apostle Paul and they agree he did indeed write most of the new Testament. The disagreement deals with the Resurrection. Those scholars who disagree argue that Paul wrote the New Testament letters about 50 years after the Crucifixion. They argue that because it was so long after the event facts get distorted and recollections fade making Pauls, letter regarding the Resurrection lacking in evidence. However, once again there is evidence that Paul, traveled to Jerusalem only  three years after the event and spoke with Peter and other Disciples who witnessed the Crucifixion and met with Jesus Christ after his Resurrection. In that timeframe both events were common knowledge among the people of Jerusalem. This is a paraphrased summary of Andy Stanley's Easter message at NorthPoint Ministries in Atlanta Georgia. My point is that there is far more fact and evidence in the Holy Bible, including Creation than there is in Darwin's Theory of evolution.

breckenridge
breckenridge

@SGTGrit 

Since Darwin rolled out his theory of evolution, many many  attempts to disprove it over the years have failed. And it will remain valid until such point in time that it is disproved - likely never.


In the very early version of the New Testament, Jesus died and was buried.  The women then appeared at his grave and they were scared.  And the story ended right there.  But early readers said "hey this ending sucks, we want a better ending."  And so the resurrection nonsense was added.


Jesus, by the way, was put to death for raising hell at the temple.  The Romans ruled with an iron fist and didn't put up with any such disturbances.


Lastly, the New Testament portrayal of Pontius Pilate is at odds with the historic record.  In the New Testament Pilate is sympathetic to the plight of Jesus. In actuality he was a bloodthirsty extremist so over the top he was eventually recalled to Rome because of his harshness.

SGTGrit
SGTGrit

@breckenridge @SGTGrit  Breckenridge, you're not an educated scholar of Biblical history. I was referring to educated scholars not atheist arguments of conjecture. As for Darwin his theory remains unproven as I indicated in my post. Feel free to attempt to prove it.