Donald Trump: Right question, wrong answer

AP file photo

AP file photo

Donald Trump has an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal today that hinges on this sentence:

“Let me ask America a question: How has the ‘system’ been working out for you and your family?”

As you might expect, he describes a series of ways in which the “system” — some of which we might just call “the rule of law” — has failed Americans. He also, as is his custom, includes a number of demonstrably false things along the way. One example: It is not true that Ted Cruz “has been mathematically eliminated by the voters.” If Cruz were to win all delegates in the remaining states, he would have 1,314 delegates; 1,237 are needed to clinch the nomination. This may be unlikely, but it is not mathematically impossible. Trump also repeats the lie that something was amiss in Colorado’s delegate-selection process — other than his campaign’s and supporters’ inability to follow the rules that had been set months in advance. This is all par for the course with Trump, who despite his yuuuge ego wants voters to think about everything but him — when it comes to his own trustworthiness and fitness for the presidency.

So, given his penchant for spreading falsehoods, not only in this op-ed but most every time he opens his mouth, there is another question that ought to asked of those who believe the “system” has failed them:

Why in the world would you believe anything Donald J. Trump says about fixing the system, or anything else?

This is a man who:

In these ways and others, Trump has more in common with the “career politicians” he wants you to blame for everything wrong with the “system.”

So, yes, the question is whether Americans are being well-served by the government they have elected. But the answer is not, to anyone who has spent any time considering his history and actions, Donald Trump.

Reader Comments 0

65 comments
McGarnagle
McGarnagle

I think its most damaging that "conservatives" like Hannity, Rush, and Gingrich do not condemn Trump and instead have this blind view that they will support the Republican nominee even if he is the most unqualified person in history.

MarkVV
MarkVV

One could fairly accurately say that in the presidential primary campaign we now have three flawed candidates. (Two Democrats and three Republicans.) Perhaps it would be more useful, however, to concentrate on the strengths as potential President rather than the flaws. That would lead to the Democratic candidate with the best chance to be nominated, but on the Republican side to the candidate, who has the least chance to be nominated.

Starik
Starik

@MarkVV What's flawed about Kasich?  He's not a demagogue?

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

Any candidate who isn't opposed to liberal fascism--Obozocare as one example--isn't an American and is therefore unqualified.

Starik
Starik

@Lil_Barry_Bailout Try to think rationally.  Obamacare is flawed to be sure, but what do you want to do, repeal it and remove medical insurance from millions of people? If the only "Americans" are those who embrace your politics it's rather a small number of people.

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

Since I'm not into government using force against the citizenry, I'd propose an opt-out provision. That way, the vast majority of caring, generous folks could continue to walk their talk, while those who object to this bit of liberal fascism could make their own choices on healthcare. And since we're a "small number", any negative effect on Obozocare would be minimal.

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

There's a whole book on the subject. You could educate yourself, if you wished.

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

Indeed there are three flawed candidates. One scumbag felonious hag, one economically retarded socialist, and Trump.

Starik
Starik

@Lil_Barry_Bailout Still, what's your alternative to Obamacare?  I, for one, don't like picking up the tab for the uninsured with my tax money.

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

Under Obamacare, you're still picking up the tab, through your tax money, higher health insurance premiums, narrower provider networks, or a combination. There's no magical way of giving people free stuff without someone else paying.

Starik
Starik

@Lil_Barry_Bailout So you prefer to keep the pre-Obamacare system?  Why not have a government-run single payer system where basic health care, emergency and catastrophic injuries or illnesses are covered?  I don't see any alternative that would cover everybody and distribute the cost to everybody. 


Drug, medical, hospital, and other costs could be brought under control, and private insurance could still exist as a supplement to the basic system. 

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

Because paying other people's bills isn't my responsibility.

Starik
Starik

@Lil_Barry_Bailout If you live in Fulton or DeKalb you pay for Grady.  Grady serves the whole state, the moochers.

FIGMO2
FIGMO2

Even IF his campaign were organized and competent, it wouldn't mean Donald COULD be.

A clear lack of thought? I'd hazard a guess that DT suffers from ADD. He lacks study skills.

Somethin' ain't RIGHT about the guy.

He's more flawed than Hillary.

Starik
Starik

The "rule of law" loses a lot of it's validity in Georgia, where those who make the laws deserve very little respect, or the Congress, where the laws are written to protect the 1%, who make the bulk of the campaign contributions.

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

The rule of law loses its validity when Obama ignores it and unilaterally makes up his own.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@Starik You have nailed it. It is the law for "them" but not for "us."

MarkVV
MarkVV

Kyle summarizes many, if not most, of the things that are wrong with Trump as a candidate for President. But I disagree in one point – when Kyle calls Trump’s statement that something was amiss in Colorado’s delegate-selection process “repeating a lie.” By any definition that cannot be called “a lie.” It is immaterial that Trump’s campaign failed to follow the rules that had been set months in advance.” .

The Republican party is a national party, and the notion that each in each state the rules for selecting the nominee can be different is ridiculous. There are basically two systems in this matter, one according to which the nominee is selected by the party, usually at a convention, without any voting by the population; the other one, a democratic process in which the nominee is selected by election.  The hodge-podge of rules different from state to state while pretending that the process is democratic is a falsehood.

The Democrats have created the same problem with their “superdelegates,” and the right-wing commentators are apt to point that out, but then tacitly disregard the much worse system the Republicans have. 

MarkVV
MarkVV

@xxxzzz @MarkVV I could not care less - that was not the point I was making. It was that Trump has it  right when he says that the system is crooked, rigged, and that it cannot be excused by saying "he knew the rules."

xxxzzz
xxxzzz

@MarkVV Colorado is not much different than a caucus.  Its very different from superdelegates who get selected by virtue of their political position.

MarkVV
MarkVV

@xxxzzz @MarkVV It is not just that, and it is not just the question of Colorado. Trump is certainly right when he says that for a democratic process, the number of delegates should be proportional to the number of the votes the candidate receives. In that the Democrats have a far superior system than the Republicans, in spite of the superdelegates. To s\ay that “those are the rules” avoids the issue.

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

Nonsense. Democrats disenfranchise five times as many voters as Republicans because of their superdelegate scam.

xxxzzz
xxxzzz

@MarkVV @xxxzzz Well then take away some of Trump's delegates.  He has far more than his % of the vote.  The system is designed to help the frontrunner, who is Trump.

Starik
Starik

@MarkVV @xxxzzz You know, it's like the people who insist that new immigrants should  obey the immigration laws.  The immigration laws make no sense whatsoever and are ridiculously complicated, just like the process for selecting a President. 

Starik
Starik

@Lil_Barry_Bailout As you see from the Georgia delegate selection process, the Republicans select their superdelegates a little differently.  Same undemocratic principle.

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

As I understand it, Republicans only have three superdelegates per state. According to Wikipedia, they are obligated to vote for whoever won the popular vote in the primary.

Starik
Starik

@Lil_Barry_Bailout What they're doing is picking Cruz delegates to represent Trump votes. After the first ballot...

lvg
lvg

Kyle just made the case for why Trump is highly qualified to be a GOP candidate.Hypocrisy , flip flopping and lying are desirable traits  based on prior candidates. 

xxxzzz
xxxzzz

@lvg I think you just made the case why Trump should be the Democratic nominee!

philmotes
philmotes

So Kyle,  you are anti Trump , right?  What if he wins the nomination. Are you going to go into a corner and sulk.  Perhaps you can join your supposed protagonist Jay Bookman.  You guys could just meld into one columnist and cheer when Hillary is elected.  That is apparently what you want.  By the way I voted for Cruz in the primary but will enthusiastically support Trump if he is the nominee.  I suspect that there are thousands more like me out there.  I see you once wrote for the Wall Street Journal.  You are apparently still loyal to them since this is their line of thinking.

RoadScholar
RoadScholar

Kyle, are you working for Cruz or Hilllary? That is the conclusion a paranoid Trump supporter will ask! Don't bother them or other repubs with details because they'll believe anything they want to believe...truth or not. Low info is low info. Cruz is the wannabe leader of the American Talibaptists. Heaven help us!

jazzycatman
jazzycatman

if America elects this moron, we are headed for trouble.  For someone from NY Trump appears to be slower than most for he either refuses to follow the rules, or he just flat out do not know.

Lil_Barry_Bailout
Lil_Barry_Bailout

It wasn't clear in my post, but I was responding to lvg regarding Our President Reagan. His foreign policy and economy were far superior to Obama's.

Starik
Starik

@Lil_Barry_Bailout I would agree with you.  Reagan was better than Obama is foreign policy, and both inherited an economy in trouble.

Caius
Caius

I find Trump to be lazy, low energy if you like.  Makes no effort to understand a problem.  Simply hires the nearest guy to fix it. Which places a premium on selecting the right guy.  The record shows that Trump has done a poor job of selecting people.  If I may quote Kyle: 

"has broken his promises to (at least) two of his wives, his creditors and his shareholders;"

This is the guy McConnell and Grassley want to select the next Justice of the Supreme Court.  

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

Kyle has laid out, in a nutshell, how crazy it is to support Trump.Yet, his witless supporters remain unable to see it.  This country is in a real mess.


Cruz is no better. His colleagues in the Senate would not spit on him if he were on fire.  He is pretty, and all that, but also nuts.


Hillary doesn't inspire trust, and Bernie is too far down the path.

xxxzzz
xxxzzz

@Starik @DaltonbywayofBickley @Wascatlady Cruz is the one who isn't a nut.  Donald the deceiver, Hillary the high crimes and misdemeanors felon and Sanders the Socialist are all nuts.  Now he does think having everyone hate him is a virtue, but that just makes him pig-headed, not nuts.